March 27, 2017Comments are off for this post.

What is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month?

What is the official Testicular Cancer Awareness Month?

The Men’s health arena has seen great strides in the last few years.  With the prominence of Movember in November, Men’s health month in June, and a handful of specialty cancer weeks throughout the year it can be hard to keep them all straight.   While all of this is extremely important, Testicular Cancer Awareness Month can get lost in the shuffle. Although there are a handful of different references and sources for Testicular Cancer Awareness Month, we recognize April as the official Testicular Cancer Awareness Month.

Why Does Testicular Cancer need an entire month to raise awareness?

By having an entire month to bring awareness and education to the masses we are able to greatly increase the likelihood of men performing testicular self exams.  Originally the first week of April (1-7) was recognized as Testicular Cancer Awareness Week.  Although the week is still recognized by many, the entire month of April has since been deemed as Testicular Cancer Awareness Month.  Receiving an entire month was an enormous victory for the testicular cancer community and those trying to bring light to the disease.  It has enabled the awareness and education of TC to reach the masses.

Why is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month so important?

Testicular Cancer is the most common cancer in males ages 15-34.  We all have loved ones that are susceptible to this disease.  By having a dedicated month for Testicular Cancer, a spotlight has been placed on the disease about the importance of understanding the risks and warning signs to look. Through dedicating an entire month, it empowers individuals, survivors, organizations, and the media to get involved in the life saving mission of insuring men know the importance of being advocates for their own health, and particularly the importance of a monthly testicular self exam.

Is there one specific organization behind Testicular Cancer Awareness Month?

The short answer is no.  Testicular Cancer Awareness Month is recognized and promoted by a host of credible well meaning organizations all working to help raise awareness, educate the public, and save lives.

What are the official Testicular Cancer Color(s)?

As you look from organization to organization, you will notice that the colors and representation of the disease differ.  There has been some debate over the years on the correct color for testicular cancer awareness and coinciding ribbons.  While we feel that TCF Blue appropriately represents the disease and our organization, below are a few other colors that have been seen over the years.

One of the original testicular cancer colors has been widely recognized as purple/violet. This color and representation of testicular cancer stems from the Orchid flower that shares the same color, and is a derivative of Orchis, the ancient Greek word for testicle.

With Lance Armstrong and the LIVESTRONG foundation there has been reference to the color yellow. However LIVESTRONG represents an array of cancers, not just testicular cancer.

There are also numerous organizations that use various shades of blue to represent their brand and personal testicular cancer efforts.

What can you do to get involved and help in the efforts for April?

There are opportunities for every type of person and organization to aide in the efforts of the testicular cancer foundation and to raise much needed awareness for the disease. April is a great time to start, but don’t let April 30th stop your advocating efforts. We need help year round. Here are a few ways to get involved:

-       Host an event: Hosting an event is a great way to help raise awareness and get the community involved. Download the fundraising toolkit here.

-       Order Self Exams Shower Cards: Ordering shower cards for yourself, loved ones, friends, family, religious group, or business is a great way to help insure the men in your life know the importance of a self exam.

-       Buy TCF merchandise: By wearing Testicular Cancer Foundation t-shirts and wristbands you not only look great, but you open up conversation about the disease which can create a dialogue on the importance of understanding the risks and warning signs of the disease.

-       Set up a fundraising page: Setting up a fundraising page is easy, takes only a few minutes and is a great way to help the organization. By raising funds, you are able to help fund our crucial programs. The Testicular Cancer Foundation operates on a 100% model meaning overhead expenses are covered by “Angel Donors” so you can fundraise in peace knowing 100% of the funds raised are going directly to saving lives.

Where can I get a free shower card for myself, friend or loved one?

We at the Testicular Cancer Foundation have an initiative to provide a free shower card to every household in America.  Click Here to order your free shower card today.

September 22, 2016Comments are off for this post.

Why testicular cancer is curable?

The above statement is a popular search query. We would never be first to say that TC is curable, we prefer the word beatable. That being said, the statistics for surviving testicular cancer are very good, and it is one of the most beatble forms of cancer.

In the early 1970’s

If you were diagnosed with testicular cancer and you had early-stage testicular cancer, the survival rate was 20%. Even worse, if the cancer calls had progressed past those early stages, survival rate was around 5%.

Today

If you are diagnosed with testicular cancer today, it is one of the most beatable forms of cancer. The 5-year relative survival rate for all men with this cancer is 95%. If the cancer hasn’t spread outside the testicular (stage 1), the 5-year relative survival rate is 99%. Even if the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes, the rate is still 96%.

What changed the survival rates?

Dr. Lawrence Einhorn is arguably the biggest proponent for the increase in these survival rates. In 1973, Dr Einhorn joined the IU school of Medicine Faculty as their first medical oncologist. A year later, he would test a platinum based drug called Cisplatin in a clinical trial. After some trial and error, he ultimately developed a strategy to combine the Cisplatin with two additional drugs that were effective in killing testicular cancer cells.

The results of this three drug regimen (BEP) were outstanding, and are now the standard for most testicular cancer treatment protocols today. Thanks to Dr. Einhorn and his team, testicular cancer survival rates are outstanding and it is extremely beatable, even at later stages of the disease.

http://cancer.iu.edu/news-publications/Einhorn.shtml

September 22, 2016Comments are off for this post.

Why is testicular cancer caused?

Testicular Cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of one or both testicles. Although the exact cause of most testicular cancers is unknown, there are a host of risk factors associated with testicular cancer that can increase the risk, but any male with testicles is susceptible to the disease.

To see a list of the risk factors please visit our risk factors page.

http://www.cancer.org/cancer/testicularcancer/detailedguide/testicular-cancer-what-causes

September 22, 2016Comments are off for this post.

Why is testicular cancer bad?

Testicular Cancer, like all cancers is serious, and that can be classified by some as “bad.” There are symptoms and risk factors that can be associated with the disease. Below are some of the bad, and good news that is associated with testicular cancer.

The Bad News

  • We have one young man dying every single day from testicular cancer
  • Every hour one male is diagnosed with testicular cancer
  • Testicular Cancer is the most common cancer in males ages 15-34

The Good News

  • Testicular cancer is 99% beatable if caught in stage 1.
  • Testicular cancer is one of the most beatable types of cancer
  • If caught early, a simple surgery (orchiectomy) is all the treatment needed
  • If the cancer has spread outside the testicle, survival rates are still 95%
  • You have incredible resources and networks if diagnosed (including the Testicular Cancer Foundation) that can help you every step of the way.

September 22, 2016Comments are off for this post.

Why does testicular cancer occur?

Testicular Cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of one or both testicles. Although the exact cause of most testicular cancers is unknown, there are a host of risk factors associated with testicular cancer that can increase the risk, but any male with testicles is susceptible to the disease.

To see a list of the risk factors please visit our risk factors page.

Source: http://www.cancer.org/cancer/testicularcancer/detailedguide/testicular-cancer-what-causes

September 22, 2016Comments are off for this post.

Where does Testicular Cancer form?

Testicular Cancer, is developed in the sperm-producing cells knows as germ cells. More than 90% of cancers of the testicle develop in these “germ cells.” The two main germ cell tumors in men are Seminoma and Non Seminoma, and both originate in the testis.

These Germ Cell tumors in men can start in several parts of the body, including:

  • The testicles
  • The back of the abdomen near the spine (retroperitoneum)
  • The central portion of the chest between the lungs (mediastinum)
  • The lower spine
  • A small gland in the brain the pineal gland, although it is extremely rare

It is extremely important to know your body and the importance of a testicular self exam. Become familiar with the warnings signs and risk factors associated with Testicular Cancer.

September 22, 2016Comments are off for this post.

What do I do after treatment?

First, you need to celebrate.

After your treatment, and you are deemed “in remission” there is a host of follow up tests and protocols that you may follow depending on your doctor’s recommendations. Many of the tests are similar or the same tests that were done to determine your diagnosis of testicular cancer. Below are some of the standard tests, but your doctor will determine the best protocol for you.

  • Chest x-ray: An x-ray of the organs and bones inside the chest. An x-ray is a type of energy beam that can go through the body and onto film, making a picture of areas inside the body.
  • CT scan(CAT scan): A procedure that makes a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body, taken from different angles. The pictures are made by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. A dye may be injected into a vein or swallowed to help the organs or tissues show up more clearly. This procedure is also called computed tomography, computerized tomography, or computerized axial tomography.
  • Serum tumor marker test: A procedure in which a sample of blood is examined to measure the amounts of certain substances released into the blood by organs, tissues, or tumor cells in the body. Certain substances are linked to specific types of cancer when found in increased levels in the blood. These are called tumor markers The following 3 tumor markers are used in staging testicular cancer: Alpha – fetoprotein (AFP), Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG), and Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH).

The results of these tests will continue to be done for some time after treatment has ended. The results of these tests can show if your condition has changed or if the cancer has come back. These tests are known as “follow up” or check ups.

Men who have had Testicular Cancer have an increased risk for developing cancer in the other testicle (don’t worry the chances are only slightly higher), so patients are advised to regularly check the other testicle and report any unusual symptoms to a doctor right away.

September 22, 2016Comments are off for this post.

Should I consider a clinical trial?

What Is a clinical trial?

A clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer, including testicular cancer.

Does a clinical trial start before, during or after my cancer treatment?

Clinical trials and their timeframe can vary. Some clinical trials only include patients who have not yet received treatment. Other trials test treatments for patients whose cancer has not gotten better. There are also clinical trials that test new ways to stop cancer from recurring, or clinical trials that can reduce the side effect of cancer treatment.

Am I a candidate for any clinical trials?

You very well could be a candidate, and it is best to talk with you doctor about the risks and benefits of taking part in a clinical trial. For references and more information about clinical trials please visit the NCI website.

Source: Cancer.gov

September 22, 2016Comments are off for this post.

How does testicular cancer affect the body?

Testicular Cancer can affect the body in many ways. Below is a list of some, but not all of the possible symptoms one might experience before being diagnosed with testicular cancer.

  • Painless lump or swelling on either testicle. If detected early, a testicular tumor may be about the size of a pea or a marble, but it can grow much larger.
  • Pain or discomfort, with or without swelling, in a testicle or the scrotum.
  • Change in the way a testicle feels or a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum. For example, one testicle may become more firm than the other testicle. Or, testicular cancer may cause the testicle to grow bigger or to become smaller.
  • Dull ache in the lower abdomen or groin
  • Sudden buildup of fluid in the scrotum
  • Breast tenderness or growth. Although rare, some testicular tumors produce hormones that cause breast tenderness or growth of breast tissue, a condition called gynecomastia.
  • Lower back pain, shortness of breath, chest pain, and bloody sputum or phlegm can be symptoms of later-stage testicular cancer.

If you experience any of these symptoms we recommend scheduling an appointment with a doctor immediately.

September 2, 2016Comments are off for this post.

Where is testicular cancer located?

Testicular Cancer is classified into two main categories of germ cell tumors, seminoma and non seminoma. Both seminoma and non-seminoma originate in the testicles, and depending on stage (hyperlink stage to Stages page) and severity, testicular cancer can travel to other places in the body.

Types of Testicular Cancer:

More than 90% of cancers of the testicle develop in cells knows as “germ cells”. These cells are the cells that make sperm. The two main germ cell tumors in men are:

Non Seminoma – These types of germ cells are most prevalent in men in their late teens to early 30’s. There are four main subtypes of non-seminoma tumors: Embryonal carcinoma, Yolk sac carninoma, Choriocarcinoma, and Teratoma. Although there are four main subtypes, most tumors are a mix of different types, but this doesn’t necessarily change the general approach to treatment of most non seminoma cancers.

Seminoma – Seminomas tend to grow and spread slower than non seminomas. There are two main subtypes of these tumors; classical seminomas, and spermatocytic seminomas. With 95% of seminomas falling under the “classical” subtype, spermatocytic are rare, and typically occur in older men (average age of 65).

Where Does Testicular Cancer Travel?

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood: Testicular cancer originates in the testis, and depending on the stage can travel to lymph nodes, abdomen, lungs, and other parts of the body, including the brain in serious cases.

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12600 Hill Country Blvd, Suite R-270 Austin, TX 78738 • info@tcancer.org • 855-390-8231

© 2017 Testicular Cancer Foundation, a 501(c)(3) registered nonprofit | Privacy Policy