Testicular Cancer is classified into two main categories of germ cell tumors, seminoma and non seminoma. Both seminoma and non-seminoma originate in the testicles, and depending on stage (hyperlink stage to Stages page) and severity, testicular cancer can travel to other places in the body.

Types of Testicular Cancer:

More than 90% of cancers of the testicle develop in cells knows as “germ cells”. These cells are the cells that make sperm. The two main germ cell tumors in men are:

Non Seminoma – These types of germ cells are most prevalent in men in their late teens to early 30’s. There are four main subtypes of non-seminoma tumors: Embryonal carcinoma, Yolk sac carninoma, Choriocarcinoma, and Teratoma. Although there are four main subtypes, most tumors are a mix of different types, but this doesn’t necessarily change the general approach to treatment of most non seminoma cancers.

Seminoma – Seminomas tend to grow and spread slower than non seminomas. There are two main subtypes of these tumors; classical seminomas, and spermatocytic seminomas. With 95% of seminomas falling under the “classical” subtype, spermatocytic are rare, and typically occur in older men (average age of 65).

Where Does Testicular Cancer Travel?

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood: Testicular cancer originates in the testis, and depending on the stage can travel to lymph nodes, abdomen, lungs, and other parts of the body, including the brain in serious cases.