Testicular Cancer can affect the body in many ways. Below is a list of some, but not all of the possible symptoms one might experience before being diagnosed with testicular cancer.

  • Painless lump or swelling on either testicle. If detected early, a testicular tumor may be about the size of a pea or a marble, but it can grow much larger.
  • Pain or discomfort, with or without swelling, in a testicle or the scrotum.
  • Change in the way a testicle feels or a feeling of heaviness in the scrotum. For example, one testicle may become more firm than the other testicle. Or, testicular cancer may cause the testicle to grow bigger or to become smaller.
  • Dull ache in the lower abdomen or groin
  • Sudden buildup of fluid in the scrotum
  • Breast tenderness or growth. Although rare, some testicular tumors produce hormones that cause breast tenderness or growth of breast tissue, a condition called gynecomastia.
  • Lower back pain, shortness of breath, chest pain, and bloody sputum or phlegm can be symptoms of later-stage testicular cancer.

If you experience any of these symptoms we recommend scheduling an appointment with a doctor immediately.