August 18, 2016No Comments

Will I be Able to Have Kids?

The removal of one testicle, coupled with other aspects of treatment, can mean a decrease in fertility. Before undergoing treatment, virtually all testicular cancer patients “bank” sperm, which is like donating to a sperm bank, only the sperm is for your future use. Not all testicular cancer survivors become infertile, but banking sperm is considered good “insurance” to have, just in case. And we strongly recommend this. Contact us if you have more questions about banking sperm.

August 18, 2016No Comments

Will I Lose a Testicle?

When diagnosed with testicular cancer, they will remove the cancerous testicle through a surgery called an Inguinal Orchiectomy:

Inguinal orchiectomy: A procedure to remove the entire testicle through an incision in the groin. A tissue sample from the testicle is then viewed under a microscope to check for cancer cells. (The surgeon does not cut through the scrotum into the testicle to remove a sample of tissue for biopsy, because if cancer is present, this procedure could cause it to spread into the scrotum and lymph nodes. It's important to choose a surgeon who has experience with this kind of surgery.) If cancer is found, the cell type (seminoma or non seminoma) is determined in order to help plan treatment. [1]

Can I get prosthetic/implant after surgery? 

Artificial and prosthetic testicle implants are available. The prosthetic testicle is implanted in the scrotum and has a similar weight and texture to that of a normal testicle. Some men have expressed that a prosthetic testicle is uncomfortable, and many opt to not have one. As each individual is different, we encourage talking with your doctor about the the options, risks, and best timing when considering a prosthetic/implant.

Source: http://www.cancer.gov

August 18, 2016No Comments

How is Testicular Cancer Diagnosed?

How is Testicular Cancer Diagnosed?

When a lump is detected—either by you or a physician—you should seek the opinion of a urologist as soon as possible. Urologists usually recommend one or more of the following tests to confirm whether a lump is a sign of testicular cancer:

  • Ultrasound: Ultrasound tests use sound waves to help doctors create a “picture” of what’s going on in specific areas of the body. In this case, the ultrasound focuses on the testicles and scrotum, and can determine whether lumps are solid or fluid-filled, and whether they’re on or inside the testicle.
  • Blood Test: We all naturally have what are known as “tumor markers” in our blood. Tumor marker levels tend to be elevated when cancer is present, but they can be elevated for other reasons as well. High tumor marker levels don’t necessarily mean you have cancer, but they can help doctors make an accurate diagnosis.
  • Testicle Removal (orchiectomy): If your urologist has good reason to believe the lump is cancerous, surgery to remove the testicle may be recommended. This allows further examination and lab testing of the testicle to determine if the lump is indeed cancerous, and if it is, what kind of cancer is in play.[1]
[1] National Cancer Institute, 2014. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/testicular/Patient
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12600 Hill Country Blvd, Suite R-270 Austin, TX 78738 • info@tcancer.org • 855-390-8231

© 2017 Testicular Cancer Foundation, a 501(c)(3) registered nonprofit | Privacy Policy